How Far Have We Come: 1992 Worcester   Official City Website

Worcester, central Massachusetts' urban center, is a mixture of small town friendliness with some of the finest elements of urban life, including:

Worcester's Hiking, Biking, Snowshoeing and Open Space   Worcester - Precursor of the Revolution

Worcester Postcards of Old     Worcester 1673-1908     Worcester 1911-Current

Who Was Worcester's Major Taylor and What Events Celebrate Him?

Worcester

WORCESTER CENTER FOR CRAFTS [I-5]
25 Sagamore Road, Worcester, MA 01609
508-753-8183 fax: 508-797-5626
Contact: Amy Black Email address:
wcc@worcestercraftcenter.org
Website:
www.worcestercraftcenter.org

The Worcester Center for Crafts is New England’s center for craft education. Established in 1856 as the Worcester Employment Society, the Center forged a tradition for economic empowerment by teaching immigrants the skills needed to create and sell crafts. Visit the great Gallery Gift Shop.

WORCESTER HISTORICAL MUSEUM [I-6]
30 Elm Street, Worcester, MA 01609
508-753-8278 fax: 508-753-9070
Contact: Bill Wallace Email address:
info@worcesterhistory.org 
Website:
www.worcesterhistory.org 

Founded in 1875, Worcester Historical Museum is a unique organization dedicated to collecting, preserving, and interpreting Worcester's history in all time periods and subject areas. The holdings of WHM encompass thousands of unique documents and artifacts vital to the study of Worcester history. 

CHILDHOOD HOME OF U.S. POET LAUREATE STANLEY KUNITZ
4 Woodford Street, Worcester MA 01607
508-797-4770
Contact: Greg and Carol Stockmal Email address:
cajohnsonj@aol.com
Website:
www.wcpa.homestead.com

Poet, editor, essayist, translator, who became America’s 10th poet laureate at the age of 95, succeeding Robert Pinsky. First published in 1930. He has written in conversational tone of such complex themes as the work of a poet, loss, time, and the chaos of inner life. Private home, not open to public except rare occasions. 

HIGGINS ARMORY MUSEUM 
100 Barber Avenue, Worcester, MA 01606
508-853-6015
Contact: Tara Young Email address:
higgins@higgins.org
Website:
www.higgins.org

Enjoy the distinction of the only museum in the Western Hemisphere entirely devoted to the study and display of arms and armor. Discover the vaulted Medieval Great Hall. Artifacts ranging from Corinthian helmets of ancient Greece to ornate suits of armor from the height of the Renaissance give our visitors an exciting glimpse into the past.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT AMERICAN MUSEUM, UNION STATION
2 Washington Sq, Union Station, Worcester, MA
508-770-1515 fax: 508-526-8787
Contact: Cyrus D. Lipsitt Email address:
events@fdrheritage.org
Website:
www.fdrheritage.org

Newly opened museum!! Dr. Joseph Plaud, FDR collector and Museum president.

BROAD MEADOW BROOK CONSERVATION CENTER AND WILDLIFE SANCTUARY
414 Massasoit Road, Worcester, MA 01604
508-753-6087

The Massachusetts Audubon Society. Explore over 400 acres of woods, fields, streams, and marsh. Look for 78 different species of butterflies, prowl for owls, or learn to snowshoe. Enjoy interpretive exhibits including a large 3-D model of the entire sanctuary and a wall-to-ceiling map of the Blackstone River watershed. Trails are open everyday dawn to dust. Call for registration.

 

  American Antiquarian Society: A renown national research facility of American history and culture.

Mechanics Hall: Recognized as the finest pre-Civil War concert hall in the nation. This fine hall hosts free Wednesday noon brown bag lunch concert series as well as the finest of globally respected artists and performances.

Higgins Armory: Over 70 suits of armor within a Gothic arch environment bring you back centuries to another world.

  Worcester Art Museum: One of the finest art museums in New England with over 35,000 pieces covering 5000 years of art and antiquities. Free Sat admission 10-4pm.

The Worcester Art Museum, which opened to the public in 1898, is world-renowned for its 35,000-piece collection of paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, photography, prints, drawings and new media. The works span 5,000 years of art and culture, ranging from ancient Roman mosaics to Colonial silver, Impressionist paintings and contemporary art. Dedicated to the promotion of art and art education, the Museum offers a year-round studio art and art appreciation program that enrolls over 6,000 adult and youth students each year. Public tours are offered Saturdays at 11 a.m. and Sundays at 1 p.m., September through May. Audio tours are also available in English and Spanish.

Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. (evening hours sponsored by Commerce Bank), and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and full-time college students with current ID, and FREE for Members and all youth 17 and under. Admission is also FREE for everyone on Saturday mornings, 10 a.m.-noon. The Museum is located at 55 Salisbury St., Worcester, Mass., easily accessible from the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90), Route 290 and Route 9. Free parking is available near entrances on Salisbury, Lancaster and Tuckerman streets. For more information, call (508) 799-4406 or visit the Museum web site at www.worcesterart.org 

 

Ecotarium: The natural world with over 200 animals, trails, canopy walk, planetarium, train ride and activities.

Worcester Historical Museum: Various presentations and exhibits of Worcester's history and beyond.

Foothills Theatre: A full-time professional theatre group producing eight shows each season from dramas to comedies to musicals.

Arts Worcester: A non-profit organization hosting satellite galleries, a newsletter and other supportive advocacy roles for Worcester area artists.

Music Worcester: 141 year old presenter of performances of renowned symphonies, world music, jazz, chorus and chamber ensembles.

Worcester Center for Crafts: A regional visual arts gallery for tourist or native offering a gift store, classes and studios for various crafts of ceramics, pottery, photography, textiles and more.

The Centrum: Worcester's entertainment center hosting concerts, shows, etc. and Convention Center.

City Hall: A link to city government

Worcester College Consortium: A link to all the colleges in and around Worcester

Other significant Worcester organizations or sites: Tuckerman Hall designed in 1902 by Josephine Wright Chapman and used for concerts, lectures, other events; the Salisbury Mansion built in 1772 by Stephen Salisbury and restored as historical home; Preservation Worcester; Performing Arts School of Worcester; American Sanitary Plumbing Museum which preserves the history of American Plumbing industry.

Also, African Heritage Institute (508-757-2222), American Guild of Organists (508-791-2893), Audio Journal (508-797-1117), Central Mass Symphony Orchestra (617) 439-8900 x 6614, Centro Las Americas (508-798-1900), Daughters of American Revolution (508-797-3530), First Night Worcester (508-799-4909), Forum Theatre (508-799-9166), Henry Lee Willis Community Center (508-799-0702), Heywood Gallery, Italian-American Cultural Center ( 508-754-7100).

And, Joy of Music Program (508-792-5667), Master Singers of Worcester (508-791-2893), Opera Worcester (508-753-0666), Salisbury Lyric Opera Guild (508-752-2077), Salisbury Singers (508-799-3848), Very Special Arts Worcester (508-350-7713), WCUW (508-753-1012), WICN Public Radio (508-752-0700), Worcester County Poetry Assoc (508-797-4770), Worcester Cultural Commission (508-799-1400) and the Worcester Women's History Project (508-767-1852).

Beyond Worcester:

Tower Hill Botanical Garden: 132 acres of formal and casual gardens , trails and meadows with an Educational and visitors center and classrooms, shop, cafe and subtropical plants. Home of Worcester County Horticultural Society.

Wachusett Mountain: Skiing nearby and other activities throughout the year.

Worcester Women's History Project

A booklet has recently been printed by the Worcester Women's History project that wonderfully describes the role that Worcester and central Massachusetts played in the historic struggle for women as well as racial equality. It highlights the bold initiatives and the people behind them, who were not always very popular or easily received, whose courage led to the changes that finally resulted in voting rights for women and free men (former slaves). 

Worcester's role in history is often ignored, yet its part in the American Revolution, in the printing industry with Isaiah Thomas and its role for equal rights is nearly unparalleled. This 46 page booklet describes historic places, both intact and long gone, the leaders who boldly led the charge in the national struggle for equal rights as well as the "foot soldiers" who added strength to the vision to bring it to fruition. 

Although the booklet is not available on their website, events and some history are available as well as contact names. 

 

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